Effects of Antipsychotic Treatment on S100B and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Schizophrenia

Xuan Wang, Yun Bian, Lei Liu, Yaxue Wu, FudeYang, Xianyun Li, Xiaole Han, Li Tian, Xingguang Luo, Song Chen, Zhiren Wang, Yunlong Tan, Yanli Li

2019/11

Background: The study aimed to examine the antipsychotic treatment effect on the serum S100B and oxidative stress in patients with schizophrenia.
Methods: Subjects consisted of patients with schizophrenia of first-episode drug-naive and drug-free acute phases, and met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. All patients were treated with risperidone for eight weeks. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was evaluated, and serum levels of S100B and parameters of oxidative stress including total oxidative status (TOS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured before and after antipsychotic treatment. A general linear random-effect model was used for data analysis.
Results: Antipsychotic treatment with risperidone reduced the levels of S100B significantly in the first episode drug-naive patients with schizophrenia (Beta=24.89; p=0.0087) and marginally in the drug-free acute phase (Beta=15.65; p=0.093), no significant difference in the effect on S100B between patient groups (p=0.4785). In contrast, antipsychotic treatment increased the levels of MDA in drug-free acute phase schizophrenia (Beta=-6.55; p<0.0001) but not in the first episode drug-naive patients (beta=-0.57; p=0.6631); the effects on MDA were significantly different between two patient groups (p=0.0020). We found that the levels of S100B were only associated with the PANSS negative score in the drug-free acute phase patients who were treated with antipsychotics.
Conclusion: Antipsychotic treatment with risperidone reduced the levels of S100B in first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia, but may increase the levels of MDA in drug-free acute phase schizophrenia.

DOI:10.36316/gcatr.01.0018

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